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  Welcome to Vocal-Care.com, please feel free to browse our store. Date: 25/06/2017 
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Information Centre

This area is intended to provide links to more in-depth information relating to the products we sell and their uses. It will evolve over time.

Dry Mouth

Dry mouth conditions range from very minor problems caused by over use of the voice or nervous tension, to total shut down of the saliva glands. Saliva has many functions. It lubricates the ingested foods and protects mucous membranes from irritation and toxic substances. The flow of saliva aids in removing materials from the mouth in a cleaning action. It maintains a neutral pH. thereby limiting the acid producing effect of the breakdown of sugars on the teeth and development of tooth decay. Saliva also has antibacterial and coagulation properties.

Salivary gland dysfunction (Dry Mouth) can be caused by local glandular effects or systemic disease. In terms of local glandular effects, two Dry Mouth conditions may arise: hyposalivation (moderate) or xerostomia (severe). The result is difficulty in chewing, swallowing and digesting food. The most prevalent forms of xerostomia are found in cancer patients taking radiation treatments, especially those with cancer in the neck and head area.

Systemically, Sjorgren's Syndrome is the most prevalent cause of xerostomia. It is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease in which the body's exocrine secretions - the eyes, nose, mouth and vagina - dry up. Other systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis, cystic fibrosis, hormonal dysfunction (thyrotoxicosis and diabetes), seleroderma, hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia alcoholic cirrhosis, malnutrition and lichen planus are all associated with xerostomia.

Additionally, it is estimated that 25% of the elderly and 10% of AIDS patients suffer from xerostomia.

Thayers Dry Mouth product information

Over 20,000,000 people suffer from Dry Mouth. This ranges from minor problems (hyposalivation) caused by overusing the voice or nervous tension, to severe salivary gland dysfunction (xerostomia), caused by medications, SjÖgren's Syndrome, stress, AIDS, radiation treatment and aging. Now Thayers™ Dry Mouth Lozenges & Sprays are being marketed to doctors and dentists who treat dry mouth and are available through health food stores.

Causes of Dry Mouth

Dry Mouth conditions range from very minor problems caused by over use of the voice or nervous tension, to total shut down of the saliva glands. Saliva has many functions. It lubricates the ingested foods and protects mucous membranes from irritation and toxic substances. The flow of saliva aids in removing materials from the mouth in a cleaning action. It maintains a neutral pH. thereby limiting the acid producing effect of the breakdown of sugars on the teeth and development of tooth decay. Saliva also has antibacterial and coagulation properties.

Salivary gland dysfunction (Dry Mouth) can be caused by local glandular effects or systemic disease. In terms of local glandular effects, two Dry Mouth conditions may arise: hyposalivation (moderate) or xerostomia (severe). The result is difficulty in chewing, swallowing and digesting food. The most prevalent forms of xerostomia are found in cancer patients taking radiation treatments. Especially those with cancer in the neck and head area.

Systemically, Sjorgren's Syndrome is the most prevalent cause of xerostomia. It is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease in which the body's exocrine secretions - the eyes, nose, mouth and vagina - dry up. Other systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis, cystic fibrosis, hormonal dysfunction (thyrotoxicosis and diabetes), seleroderma, hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia alcoholic cirrhosis, malnutrition and lichen planus are all associated with xerostomia. Additionally, it is estimated that 25% of the elderly and 10% of AIDS patients suffer from xerostomia.

Drug Classes: Subtypes, Associated with xerostomic effects

Glandular effects that may occur in those people who are taking artificial prescribed drugs on a regular basis as indicated below:

Analgesics: narcotic Antidepressants: tricyclics, tetracyclics, MAO inhibitors. lithium
Antipruritics Anti-diarrheals: with anticholinergics
Antipsychotics Antihistamines: H 1 blockers and H2 blockers
Antinauseants/Antivertigo Antihypertensives: alpha-blockers, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors
Antispasmodics: GI and urinary Antiparkinsonism drugs: antichollinergics and dopaminergics
Cough and Cold preparations Diuretics
Sedatives Muscle Relaxants: Flexeril, Lioresal, Norflex, diazepam
Vitamins: Rocaltrol, Calderol.

Any drug that causes a decrease in blood flow to the salivary glands will lessen salivary secretions:

Anti hypertensives that lower blood pressure will decrease blood flow.

Diuretics that decrease blood flow by decreasing blood volume affect blood flow to the salivary glands.

Some specific drugs: e.g. isotretinoin (Accutane), gemfibrozil (Lopid), anti-inflammatories (NSAIDS), antineoplastics (Matulane, Myleran), anti-ulcer (Carafate), calcium supplement Neo Calglucon), antinauseants (Reglan), and nicotine patches, cause xerostomia.

Of the 25 most frequently prescribed drugs in 1992, the following drugs are associated with xerostomic side effects:

Zantac (ranitidine)
Xanax (alprazolam)
Seldane (terfenadine)
Naprosyn (naproxen) Prozac (fluoxetine)
Proventil (albuterol)
Tagamet (cimetidine)
Dyazide (triameterene)
Hydrochlorthiazide
In addition to prescribed medication, at least half of the doses ingested in the U.S. are over-the-counter drugs. Of those drugs, the most frequently used medications that have xerostomic side effects are as follows:

Laxatives - Chronulac, Phospho-Soda Antinauseants - Dramamine
Cold and Allergy products
antihistimines Anti-diarrheals - loperamide

Other drugs may also have xerostomic properties:

tobacco
marijuana
cocaine heroin
amphetamine

Dry Mouth article by Dr. Daniel Hall
Medical Director, AARP Operations, The Prudential

Most of us, during our lifetime have had an occasional episode of dryness of the mouth and have thought little about it. However chronic dry mouth is a condition that affects many individuals. and it can lead to conditions ranging from painful mouth sores to the inability to swallow or talk properly. The condition may impair daily function.

Incidence

The incidence of chronic dry mouth is surprisingly high . Studies have estimated that approximately 25 million adults in the United States suffer from this condition. The experts feel that the problem is due to an expansion of aging population, greater use of prescription medicines, more individuals who have radiation treatment of head and neck tumors and an increase in the diagnosis Sjogren's (show-grins) syndrome.

Most of our saliva comes from three pairs of salivary glands: the Parotid, which sit in front of the ears; the submandibular, which are behind the lower jaw; and, the sublingual, lie in the floor of the mouth, under the tongue. Important functions of saliva are the digestion of starches, the lubrication of mucous membranes, cleansing of the mouth, neutralization of acids and alkalies, maintenance of tooth structure, destruction of bacteria and the promotion of wound healing. Eating or sucking stimulates the salivary glands to produce 10 to 20 times more saliva as compared to that of a resting state. Most, who suffer from dry mouth, produce little saliva during the resting phase. The glands are at rest 90% of the day. Therefore, chronic dryness becomes a problem.

Some Major Causes of Dry Mouth

The major cause of dry mouth is the continuous use of some prescription drugs. In fact, a dental expert has compiled a list of 430 drugs that can cause dry mouth. They are medicines that are used for a variety of common ailments and conditions such as depression, high blood pressure pain, gastrointestinal (G.I.) spasm, urinary tract spasm, fluid retention, colds and the flu. Due to space limitations, all possible conditions cannot be listed here. However, if you suffer from dry mouth and believe that it may be due to medicine, do not stop taking that drug. Rather, discuss the situation with the doctor who prescribed the medicine for you. The benefits of the drug may outweigh the side-effect, and a reduction of dosage or change in medicine may help. Additionally, x-ray treatment of head and neck tumors may cause atrophy of the salivary glands if the glands cannot be shielded during treatment. The side effect may be a dry mouth for a prolonged period of time.

Sjogren's syndrome is another important cause of dry mouth. The syndrome is considered to be an autoimmune disease. It follows rheumatoid arthritis as second most common autoimmune disease. The disease is a condition that primarily affects middle-aged women. Currently, it is difficult to accurately determine the incidence of Sjogren's, but it has been estimated that one in 500 women may suffer from this condition. Also, it may accompany other autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and scleroderma. It is characterized by dry eyes, dry mouth and joint pain. However, in those with the disease, it has been determined that all the moisture secreting glands of the body may dry up. Often the condition is difficult to diagnose because so many parts of the body are involved, and evaluations may be presented concerning the area that causes the most difficulty.

Treatment

There are some drugs and devices that stimulate saliva flow. Saliva substitutes may be purchased and used with your physician or dentist's direction. Also, experts recommend the use of sugarless gum and candies to promote saliva flow. With the use of these options, a perplexing condition may be controlled effectively for most of those who are affected.

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